American pancakes

When I was young, my favourite movie was Matilda, and I have always wished for pancakes like hers. British pancakes are crepes; they are thin and, in most cases, are not filling and are difficult to flip. We all have a preference on how we like our pancakes, and my preference is that these are the best. This recipe will make about 35 thick pancakes that the whole family can stack and attack with maple syrup, berries, nuts and anything else that you love to tell the story.

When the pancakes start bubbling, it gets me all excited to eat them. It means that they are nearly ready to be flipped. Typically you can cook about three in a pan at once; if you try to cook more than that, they will likely stick together. On their own, they taste mildly sweet with more of a savoury flavour, but when you layer them on top of each other with toppings, they become a perfect pancake stack, just like what you see in the movies.

As this makes a lot of pancakes, you can feel free to half or quarter the recipe depending on how many people will be eating. This recipe is easily enough food for five people. These pancakes are the real deal. The last time I made these, I made up a full batch, and I ended up eating way too many; afterwards, I felt like taking a nap.

Ingredients
  • Self-raising flour (350g)
  • Sodium bicarbonate (1tsp)
  • Salt (1/2 tsp)
  • Sugar (1 tsp)
  • Butter (100g)
  • Milk (400ml)
  • Buttermilk (200ml)
  • Eggs (2)
  • Vegetable oil (50ml)

Method 

In a large bowl, mix all of the dry ingredients. Melt the butter and put it to one side to cool. Add all wet ingredients (excluding the oil) to the dry ingredients and mix well with a whisk until the batter is smooth and thick.

Let the mixture sit for about 10 minutes so that the bicarb activates and starts bubbling. Rub a little oil over the pan to grease it with a piece of kitchen paper, then turn the heat on to medium heat. Pour a ladle of the batter into the centre of the pan.

Allow the pancake to cook for a minute or so, bubbles will form in the batter, but if the pan is too hot, the bubbles will form fast, which is your indicator to reduce the heat. When the edges are golden and the bubbles are popping, turn the pancake over and cook for one minute on the other side. Continue cooking the pancakes in batches, greasing the pan between each one if needed until they are all cooked.

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