Dorayaki Recipe

Dorayaki is a Japanese light and fluffy confection that is similar to a pancake, only it is typically filled with Azuki red bean paste. It was invented in 1914 by Usagiya in the Ueno district of Tokyo. The Japanese cake can be eaten cold or hot by simply reheating them in the oven or microwave. This special Japanese cake can be filled with many other fillings such as matcha cream cheese, Nutella, custard, fresh cream but feel free to experiment with the many possible options to create the dorayaki that you love the most.

To make the best Dorayaki you should make sure to sieve the flour as it can help make the pancakes even more fluffy and light. If you want to go a step further you can even make your own red bean paste with the recipe below in the FAQ section. This recipe will make 2 dorayakis which is four individual pancakes if you want to make more simply double the recipe and enjoy. 

Ingredients

Eggs (2)
Sugar (40g)
Vanilla extract (1 tsp)
Honey (1-2 tsp)
All-purpose flour (90g)
Baking soda/powder (1tsp)
Coldwater (10ml)

Method

  1. Mix all the ingredients in a bowl and then cover it with clingfilm for 10 minutes. After 10 mins give it another mix.
  2. Spray a pan with oil or use a sheet of kitchen roll to rub the pan with oil to prevent the mixture from sticking.
  3. Put a pan on medium heat. and then fry the dorayaki in batches until cooked. After around one minute of cooking bubbles will start to form, at that point you will want to flip it over to the otherside to cook for a further minute.
  4. Turn the heat off and remove the cake from the pan to a cooling rack. Once cooled spread azuki bean paste on one dorayaki cake and put another on top to sandwich them together and repeat the processes to make as many cakes as you would like.

Frequently asked questions

How long can Dorayaki last?

You can store them on the counter in a sealed container or in the fridge for 1-3 days, although they do taste better when they have been stored at room temperature. If you want to store them for longer then do not worry you can simply wrap them individually in cling film, put them into a container, and put them in the freezer for up to a month.

Is dorayaki healthy?

As they contain quite a large amount of sugar they are not exactly a healthy option for breakfast. They can be enjoyed once in a while as a treat. Although, you could always use less sugar when making them and instead opt for a healthier filling perhaps mashed bananas or poached apple and cinnamon?

Is dorayaki gluten-free? 

Whilst our recipe is not gluten-free as it contains all-purpose flour, you could definitely make them with a gluten-free flour and the results will be relatively the same. 

Is dorayaki vegan?

Unfortunately, as our recipe uses eggs it is not suitable for vegans. Although, you could try making this with an egg replacer.

How to pronounce Dorayaki?

In Japanese dorayaki looks like this: どら焼き but when pronouncing the word in English it sounds similar to this: Door-eye-a-key

How to make red bean paste from scratch?

There are two main types of red bean paste the first is Tsubuan (粒あん) - which is a chunky bean paste and the other type is Koshian (こしあん) - which is a fine smooth paste. Prior to cooking the beans will need soaking overnight.
If you want to make smooth red bean paste you will need to cook the beans until soft then you have to make a decision. Do you want to blend the beans for a quicker way to make the paste or do you want to put them on a fine-mesh sieve and put the beans through with the back of a spoon to remove the bean skin. 
 

The second choice is the best if you want the perfect red bean paste. After pushing them through the sieve you will want to wash them by putting the beans into a bowl of water for 30 minutes then remove the water. Repeating the same process again for 15 minutes and then again for 5 minutes until the water is clear. When you get rid of the water the last time you will want to put your bean paste through a cheesecloth or fine muslin to remove all excess liquid.

After doing that you will have a fine red bean paste that you have made from scratch and all that's left to do is cook the paste with sugar and/or salt to your preference. The best sugar to bean ratio is 1:1 because it will taste great and will preserve the bean paste for a longer time. If you want to blend the beans instead, simply transfer the beans to a food processor or blender. Add 1-2 Tbsp of water if needed and run the blender until the beans become a paste. Transfer the fine paste back into the same pot. Turn the heat to medium-low heat and add sugar to your preference. 

What does dorayaki mean in Japanese? 

The word “dorayaki” comes from the Japanese word for “gong” which means Dora. Whereas the word "yaki" meaning cooked over direct heat is used in many other Japanese dish names such as teriyaki (sweet soy-sauce glazed meat or tofu), yakitori (grilled chicken skewers), and more.
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